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    It's turbulent offshore

    In offshore wind farms, the front turbines receive the most wind. They cause kilometre-long vortexes with slower wind and increased turbulence, which affects the downstream wind turbines. Previous methods that mimic such wakes are inaccurate or require considerable computation. In order to better understand these wake effects, scientists have therefore developed a new model and software to help optimise farms.  more...
     

    Measuring wind potential in low mountain ranges

    One of the highest meteorological masts in Europe is situated on Rödeser Berg, a hill near Kassel. The research facility with its measurement devices records the wind conditions up to a height of 200 metres. The aim is to measure the impact of forest areas and low mountain ranges on the wind profile and flow characteristics. The results will help to improve the meteorological models for assessing sites, will make it possible to estimate the loads on individual system components in more detail and will help to further develop the laser-based LiDAR method.  more...
     
    News 17.08.2016

    Rotor blades with elastic front edges

    During the course of their operation, countless raindrops land on the leading edge of the rotor blades used on wind turbines. Despite the special coatings and films applied to these edges, this damages the surface. Over time, this causes erosion to the leading edge of the blades. A research project is therefore testing a new approach: in future, elastic leading blade edges could solve the problem.  more...
     
    News 28.04.2016

    Mechanical mass production of rotor blades

    The rotor blades of wind turbines are still mostly made by hand. This is due to the low piece numbers involved. So how would it be possible to produce them faster, cheaper and with a greater degree of precision? Automated production is now possible in the BladeMaker factory in Bremerhaven. Eight process steps are combined into a single step. The production facility has now been inaugurated.  more...
     

    BINE interview with Professor Dr. Siegfried Heier

    Further developments of converter technology will be necessary for wind turbines to support any grid improvements. Decentralised coupling and decoupling of power ought to be possible in the future high-voltage direct current (HVDC) electric power transmission system. In this BINE interview, Professor Dr Siegfried Heier lists future focal points of technological development in the wind energy sector.  more...
     

    Wind turbines are becoming quieter

    Wind turbines are not allowed to disturb neighbouring residential buildings through the noise that they emit. Wind turbines therefore have to be kept at a distance from settlements. To further reduce and better predict noise emissions, the University of Siegen has now launched a research project. In this project, the scientists want to modify the trailing edges of the rotor blades. They also want to develop better sound forecasts for entire wind farms. Quieter wind turbines would enable more land to become available for wind power generation.  more...
     
    News 25.01.2016

    Testing rotor blades cost-effectively

    The longer the rotor blades used on wind turbines, the greater the forces acting on them. The requirements for the components rise – and with them the demands made on the testing methods. On the one hand it is important to construct the blades as durably as possible. On the other hand, however, they also need to be manufactured so that they are as cost-effective and as light as possible. If a compromise is found, this still needs to be checked in a verifiable way: on the computer and in practice.  more...
     
    News 25.11.2015

    Reliably measuring large transmission components

    Around 20 to 25 per cent of wind turbine failures are caused by damage to gears and bearings. To make the turbines more durable and safer, large gear measurement standards are used for more reliable measurements. They are intended to make wind turbines more secure and can reduce production and operating costs. The extension to a measurement laboratory in Bremen has now been inaugurated.  more...
     

    Germany’s largest nacelle test rig inaugurated

    Germany’s largest test rig for wind turbine nacelles is now in Bremerhaven. Here, drive trains with up to eight megawatts can be tested. A load transmission system mechanically simulates the wind loads occurring in the field. The Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology IWES recently commissioned the nacelle test rig.  more...
     

    Rotor blade, nacelle and foundation put to the test

    Whether on land or in the sea, wind turbines are getting bigger and the towers higher. All components undergo various preliminary tests, in order to ensure that they can withstand the strains that wind and weather place on them. In recent years, large test facilities have become available in Germany, in which complete rotor blades, nacelles, and foundations are tested. On 21 October 2015, centres will present their supply ranges at a workshop for experts.  more...
     

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